The Northeast Kingdom of Vermont is extraordinary, and the artists who live and work here are as exceptional as the landscape. Their creativity is fed by natural beauty, peace and quiet, proximity to wildlife, and the everchanging seasons. Artists are inspired by a sense of place, and the results reflect the individuality of both the people and the region.

Caspian Arts members range from seasoned professionals to those who are at the beginning of their careers. Whether defined as fine art or craft, each artist’s goal is to move along his/her personal creative path, always seeking ways to express oneself in a unique and effective manner. Its members include painters, sculptors, fiber artists and multimedia artists as well as those who work in wood, metal, clay, papers, and other traditional craft media. 

Caspian Arts was formed in 2010 as part of the State of Craft project, an extensive research effort undertaken by the Vermont Craft Council. It became apparent that the hills surrounding Caspian Lake are brimming with talented and creative artists, highlighting the need for an organization that could support local artists while contributing to the effort to establish a lively and enticing art scene in the area. Nearly a decade ago, Caspian Arts premiered an annual summer Studio Tour that also leveraged a statewide momentum for local purchasing. Our regional arts community grew from there. 

Caspian Arts members reflect upon the beauty of our Northeast Kingdom through many types of media. Visitors can view each artist’s work on dedicated pages of the Caspian Arts website. Many members welcome visitors to their studios throughout the year and all welcome inquiries and interest in their work.

The Domestic Resurrection Obligation Show features paper mache specialists and domestic resurrectionists hard at work, assisting naked humanity in its fight against the established one-directional culture. Enter the routine disasters and massacres of the human race. Garbage, along with the tricks and propositions of the domestic resurrectionists, attempt to enable humanity to redirect its ill-fated course. The Bread & Puppet Press Store and Cheap Art Emporium will be open after the performances. 

More about Bread and Puppet Theater: 

Bread & Puppet Theater is an internationally celebrated company that champions a visually rich, street-theater brand of performance art filled with music, dance and slapstick. Its shows are political and spectacular, with huge puppets made of paper maché and cardboard. Founded in 1963 by Peter Schumann on New York City’s Lower East Side, the theater has been based in the North East Kingdom of Vermont since the early 1970s.

With the health of our community in mind, patrons are expected to be vaccinated against COVID -19 and will be asked to show proof of vaccination, either with an original vaccination card, photocopy of the card, cell phone photograph, or verifiable health info PDA app.

Alternately, attendees can provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test (PCR) performed within 72 hours of the show. In accordance with CDC recommendations and Vermont Department of Health regarding indoor spaces, masks are required.

Welcome back to our Main Stage for this indoor performance!

The Domestic Resurrection Obligation Show features paper mache specialists and domestic resurrectionists hard at work, assisting naked humanity in its fight against the established one-directional culture. Enter the routine disasters and massacres of the human race. Garbage, along with the tricks and propositions of the domestic resurrectionists, attempt to enable humanity to redirect its ill-fated course. The Bread & Puppet Press Store and Cheap Art Emporium will be open after the performances. 

More about Bread and Puppet Theater: 

Bread & Puppet Theater is an internationally celebrated company that champions a visually rich, street-theater brand of performance art filled with music, dance and slapstick. Its shows are political and spectacular, with huge puppets made of paper maché and cardboard. Founded in 1963 by Peter Schumann on New York City’s Lower East Side, the theater has been based in the North East Kingdom of Vermont since the early 1970s.

A second performance will take place on Sunday, November 28 at 3:00 PM

With the health of our community in mind, patrons are expected to be vaccinated against COVID -19 and will be asked to show proof of vaccination, either with an original vaccination card, photocopy of the card, cell phone photograph, or verifiable health info PDA app.

Alternately, attendees can provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test (PCR) performed within 72 hours of the show. In accordance with CDC recommendations and Vermont Department of Health regarding indoor spaces, masks are required.

Opening Reception: October 17 | 2:00 PM 

In Summer 2021, eight accomplished wildlife artists sailed Lake Champlain aboard the Artful Otter, a 20-foot, refurbished wooden yawl. Uncovering secluded habitat, they depicted lakeside landscapes and wildlife in an innovative voyage as unique as the land itself. Artwork sales benefit environmental stewardship organizations. Click here for raffle information.

Led by Rob Mullen* (Vermont) with contributing artists, Cole Johnson* (New York), Patricia Pepin **(Quebec), John Pitcher** (Vermont), John Potter ***(Montana), Bonnie Rowell (Vermont), Beth Sightler (Vermont), and Sue Westin**** (Vermont) 

*SAA Signature Member, **SAA Distinguished Member, ***SAA Associate Member, ****SAA Master Artist

Accomplished artist Rob Mullen is a seasoned paddler… but he wasn’t a sailor. Rob embarked on a personal journey when he sought to weigh anchor on an artistic expedition. In summer 2021, Rob and a coalition of wildlife artists experienced Vermont’s Lake Champlain through an artist’s lens, with a sailor’s sense of resilience.

Rob has always been drawn to the water. He bought his first canoe with paper route money at the age of 11 and has operated 20 wilderness art expeditions, from Labrador to Alaska, that feed his work as an artist. He draws his original artistic inspiration from his time in college at the University of Vermont, where his Biology lab sketches led to illustrating for professors. He became a full-time artist upon graduation in 1978. 

With the support of the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum, Burlington City Arts, the Vermont Wildlife Coalition, and other benefactors and mentors, Rob procured a 30-year-old, 20-foot Elver yawl. Her lines were perfect for Rob’s idea of a floating studio that could creep into places where wildlife disguise themselves; it was the ideal vessel from which to access singular lakeside landscapes and wildlife, discovering habitat where a larger sailboat couldn’t go to.  Rob and his wife Bonnie worked nonstop to refurbish the boat, and nine weeks later, she was stripped to bare wood, sanded, epoxied, painted, and outfitted. Rob and his team launched the “Artful Otter” in Burlington in early June of 2021. He invited other highly regarded animal artists aboard.

Prior to Samuel de Champlain’s travels with Algonquin guides in 1609, Vermont’s indigenous Abenaki called the 124-mile-long lake “Pe-ton-bowk,” which means “waters that lie between.” The Lake plays a pivotal role in the formation of the United States. It is notorious for dangerously changeable weather and short, choppy waves that, Rob learned, require a skipper’s steadfast attention. The former critical transport corridor now provides drinking water for 250,000 people and is a hub for recreation, tourism, and of course, wildlife.

Gaining confidence with the art of sailing and the peculiarities of a sprit-rigged yawl, Rob learned that with care and focus, he could handle 20-knot winds and 3-foot waves. Joined by leading wildlife artists and good friends along the way, Rob encountered violent thunderstorms, rough conditions, and brutal heat. Anchored on the southernmost state line on July 4, he painted the confluence with the lake and later listened to the fireworks in Whitehall while enjoying a cold beer.  

The Lake is now, as it always has been, incredible wildlife habitat and an environmental resource critical for the health of all life near it, human and wild. It also plays an ineffable role in the vitality and health of the human spirit through its inspirational beauty and majesty. The artists on the Voyage of the Artful Otter uncovered the wildlife habitat of hundreds of bird species, dozens of fish species, 500-million-year-old fossils and so much more in an innovative voyage as unique as the land itself. Sales of artwork in the HCA “Voyage of the Artful Otter” exhibition benefit environmental stewardship organizations.

Artists:

Rob Mullen, Paint n Paddle Studio, West Bolton, Vermont*SAA Signature Member

robmullen.com

Growing up in Vermont gave Rob a deep admiration for the wilderness, nature, and the water. In addition to his work as an artist, Rob is the Director of the Wilderness River Expedition Art Fellowship, a program for field art at The Center for Circumpolar Studies. For two decades Rob has led artist immersion expeditions from Labrador to Alaska, feeding his art with a focus on wildlife and conservation. He draws his original artistic inspiration from his time in college at the University of Vermont, where his Biology class lab sketches led to illustrating for professors. 

Cole Johnson, Cole Johnson Art, Deposit, New York* SAA Signature Member

colejohnsonart.com    

Hunting, fishing, and spending time in the woods have been Cole’s preferred activities for most of his life. Cole prefers to work in graphite powder, where the deepest contrast between black and white breathes life into the drawing and creates a distinct mood solely based upon tonal value. Favorite subjects include the species he is intimately acquainted with in the field – the white-tailed deer, trout, turkeys, hunting dogs and waterfowl. In addition to numerous local and regional shows, Cole continues to broaden his exposure nationally.

Patricia Pepin, Bromont, Quebec* SAA Distinguished Member

patriciapepin.com

As a child, Patricia Pepin loved to roam in the woods and fields of Bromont, Quebec, observing the wilderness and drawing her many findings. She paints in oils and is interested in the traditions and techniques of her medium, with a focus on mastery of light and color in the context of conservation. Patricia exhibits paintings and prints at wildlife art shows and symposia. 

John Pitcher, Westin Pitcher Fine Art, Dorset, Vermont SAA Distinguished Member

westinpitcherart.com   

Seasoned artist John Charles Pitcher expresses his passion for birds and the natural world through his sketches and paintings.  His success in capturing the sense of a place and likeness of his subjects reveals not only his mastery of technique but also his passion and knowledge as a naturalist. As a Wilderness River Expedition Art Foundation artist crew member, Pitcher has canoed and painted the wilderness waters of the Missinaibi River, Ontario, the George River, Quebec and the migrating caribou herds of Lake Kamestastin in northern Labrador, Canada.

John Potter, Red Lodge, Montana* SAA Associate Member

johnpotterstudio.com

A devoted student of the plein air approach to painting landscape, John carries his paints and canvas panels into the field to produce small oil studies, which are later used in the studio to complete his larger compositions. He was raised in the Upper Great Lakes country – on and off the Lac du Flambeau Ojibwe Indian Reservation in northern Wisconsin – where he grew up with an abiding love for the natural world in the Great Northwoods. A solid and traditional education in the key elements of painting coupled with training in composition as a professional illustrator gives John’s work a signature style.

Bonnie Rowell, Bonnie’s Botanicals of Vermont, West Bolton, Vermont

www.bonniesbotanicalsvt.com    

Bonnie has always loved walking in the woods, noting the flowers, leaves, moss, trees, lichen, pinecones… and so much more. A relative newcomer to the art of botanical plaster casting, she appreciates Vermont’s many interesting flowers, leaves, branches and pods, and their changes from season to season. Nature’s subtleties are sometimes overlooked as shadows of their former selves, but Bonnie has a vision of their deeper impression as she becomes absorbed in her painting.

Beth Sightler, Beth Sightler Studio, Burlington, Vermont

dailypaintworks.com

A watercolor artist with a career in human services, Beth Sightler is inspired by the beauty in the world – and the contrast. She loves the flow of what she calls the unruly medium of watercolors, and she says that sometimes she likes the discipline. Painting is an emotional and physical outlet for Beth, and she paints for her own joy. When she is not painting or working, Beth is exploring the Green Mountains of Vermont or sailing Lake Champlain. 

Sue Westin, Westin Pitcher Fine Art, Dorset, Vermont* SAA Master Artist

westinpitcherart.com

Sue Westin is a versatile artist who has painted a wide variety of subjects and has worked in several art mediums: oil, watercolor, stone, and theorem painting.  She is best known for her paintings of wildlife, particularly coastal birds and bison, but also portrays still life, landscapes, architectural scenes, marine scenes, domestic animals, figure and human portraiture. Sue considers life and art an intertwined adventure of the inner workings of the mind and spirit. Her life, and her art, are informed by experiences that occur in the everyday world as well as faraway places.

Stile Antico is firmly established as one of the world’s most accomplished and innovative vocal ensembles. Working without a conductor, its twelve members have thrilled audiences on four continents with their fresh, vibrant and moving performances of Renaissance polyphony. Its bestselling recordings have earned accolades including the Gramophone Award for Early Music, Diapason d’or de l’année, Edison Klassiek Award, and Preis der deutschen Schallplattenkritik. The group has received three Grammy nominations, and performed live at the 60th Grammy Awards at Madison Square Garden. Based in London, Stile Antico has also appeared at many of the world’s most prestigious venues and festivals. The group enjoys a particularly close association with Wigmore Hall, and has performed at the BBC Proms, Buckingham Palace, Amsterdam Concertgebouw, the Palais des Beaux-Arts, Cité de la Musique, Luxembourg Philharmonie, and Leipzig Gewandhaus.

Stile Antico’s performances are often praised for their immediacy, expressive commitment, and their sensitive and imaginative response to text. These qualities arise from the group’s collaborative working style: members rehearse and perform as chamber musicians, each contributing artistically to the musical results. The group is also noted for its compelling programming, which seeks to draw out thematic connections between works to shine new light on Renaissance music.

“Perfectly exquisite.”—St. Louis Post-Dispatch

This show is presented by KCP

Session Americana is a rock band in a tea cup, or possibly a folk band in a whiskey bottle. This band/collective of talented musicians craft a musical experience unlike any other. On stage is a collapsible bar table wired with microphones, a vintage suitcase recast as a kick drum, an old Estey field organ, a pre-war parlor guitar, a mandocello and all of its smaller siblings, a harmonica case fire damaged when Jack’s bar went up in flames and graffitied by Depeche Mode roadies, and an assortment of other instruments that get passed around in this freewheeling modern hootenanny. The anything-could-happen feel of a Session Americana show depends on craft that’s not accidental or easily won; they bring a kind of ease and genuineness to this timeless music, sometimes presenting the latest batch of original songs, sometimes reaching back into depths of the American “song bag”.

With the health of our community in mind, patrons are expected to be vaccinated against COVID -19 and will be asked to show proof of vaccination, either with an original vaccination card, photocopy of the card, cell phone photograph, or verifiable health info PDA app.  

Alternately, attendees can provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test (PCR) performed within 72 hours of the show. In accordance with CDC recommendations and Vermont Department of Health regarding indoor spaces, masks are required.

Highland Center for the Arts is proud to welcome Le Vent du Nord back to our indoor Main Stage. This award-winning and highly acclaimed band is a leading force in Quebec’s progressive Francophone folk movement. The group’s vast repertoire draws from both traditional sources and original compositions while enhancing its hard-driving soulful music (rooted in the Celtic diaspora) with a broad range of global influences.

Since its inception in August 2002, Le Vent du Nord has enjoyed meteoric success, performing more than 1,800 concerts over five continents and racking up several prestigious awards, including a Grand Prix du Disque Charles Cros, two Junos (Canada’s Grammys), a Félix at ADISQ, a Canadian Folk Music Award, and “Artist of the Year” at the North American Folk Alliance Annual Gala.

The group exhibits great finesse and flexibility, appearing regularly on Canadian, American, French, and UK television and radio, and participating in a wide variety of special musical projects. They’ve collaborated and performed with a diverse range of artists including Harry Manx, Väsen, Dervish, The Chieftains, Breton musical pioneer Yann-Fañch Kemener, Québecois roots legend and master storyteller Michel Faubert, the Scottish folk band Breabach, singer Julie Fowlis, and the trans-Mediterranean ensemble Constantinople.

Not content with standard approaches to tradition, Le Vent du Nord has also created a symphonic concert that, according to Voir Montreal, “puts all traditional folk naysayers to shame.”

On stage these friends create intense, joyful, and dynamic live performances that expand the bounds of tradition in striking global directions. This is the modern sound of tradition, a music of the here and now.

With the health of our community in mind, patrons are expected to be vaccinated against COVID -19 and will be asked to show proof of vaccination, either with an original vaccination card, photocopy of the card, cell phone photograph, or verifiable health info PDA app.  

Alternately, attendees can provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test (PCR) performed within 72 hours of the show. In accordance with CDC recommendations and Vermont Department of Health regarding indoor spaces, masks are required.

Opening Reception: Sunday, September 12 | 4 PM – 6 PM

Click on the name of a featured artist to view their gallery:

Mary Ellen Bartley
Kate Emlen
Tucker Nichols
Jon Redmond
Margaret Sparrow

Still-life painting is defined as the depiction of inanimate objects for the sake of their qualities of form, colour, texture, and composition. I suspect the artists exhibited here will agree, but I also suspect all will agree that the five artists here care little about the definition. These artists bring so much more to the genre – and perhaps it to them.

During the pandemic, Jon Redmond kept close to home and found comfort in revisiting and exploring simple subjects close at hand -variations of the familiar. He paints and scrapes and repaints and creates not a painting of a thing, but a record of an event.

Mary Ellen Bartley was forced to leave Italy as the pandemic grew. She left the Morandi library and studio and quarantined in her attic studio creating a Morandi-inspired project – In Seven Things Again and Again she photographed the same seven objects every day of April. Her attic studio became a sanctuary from global anxiety. And the things on the table, a quiet alternate world, perfectly contained. Her Reading in Color series in its deliberate arrangements of used books chosen for their lush dyed page edges, textures, and sandwiched color forms, has a decidedly more vibrant and extroverted palette. “I find the color and the colorful titles a welcome escape from the relentlessly grim news cycle”.

Margaret Sparrow loves and finds beauty in everyday objects and the stillness and the light that surround them. Always in flux, Sparrow captures them and shows us that, like life, there is nothing still about it. ”It is as life itself, only one must take the time to look quietly and with care”.

Kate Emlen analyzes the still life and then brings to it a gorgeous color and point of view. Her statement, shown with her paintings, explains her process best. She questions space, form, color, texture and composition before and after painting-and then she paints. ”The doing of it is the thinking”.

Tucker Nichols captures the moment and creates one for people all over the globe. During Covid his project was called “Flowers for Sick People.” His still life paintings of flowers, painted in loud colors with markers, and spray paint, and acrylics, occupy their small space with whimsy and pride – and make their way into the hands of the unsuspecting.

Each artist incorporates the elements of the ”still life” – form, colour, texture, and composition – in their work. With their well honed craft they pay homage to everyday objects. They notice and pay attention. They interpret. And then they share.

Masking is required inside the Gallery.

Northern Harmony, a collaboration of ten brilliant singers presenting harmony singing from across the world, presents an outdoor concert on the Highland Center for the Arts outdoor stage.


Led by Larry Gordon, Northern Harmony is the highest level performing group under the umbrella of the world music organization Village Harmony, which sponsors singing camps and workshops in New England and many parts of the world. Touring Europe regularly since 1995, the group has won wide acclaim for their unique repertoire and sure command of widely diverse traditional singing styles.


The program presents a thrilling mix of world harmony traditions, including South African songs and dances, traditional polyphony from Georgia, Bulgaria, Macedonia, and Corsica, contemporary American shape-note songs, including new songs by members of the group, and renaissance Italian devotional songs.


South Africa has a particularly powerful and appealing folk harmony singing tradition, with a rich, resonant vocal sound, and wonderfully syncopated rhythm. The singing is always accompanied by dancing, with the rhythm of the dance movements often in counterpoint to the song.


Georgia’s ancient three-part harmony singing tradition features a dark, sonorous vocal quality, and startling harmonies, unlike anything in European music. Traditional Corsican singing, passed down through oral tradition, features two highly ornamented upper voices over a more sustained harmonic bass. The Balkan numbers feature the characteristic bright, “hard-voiced” vocal timbre, with dissonant harmonies frequently based on drones, and irregular dance meters in 7, 9 and 11. These pieces will also feature the Northern Harmony band of fiddle, pennywistle, accordion and percussion. The band will also play a medley of traditional dance tunes.


The shape-note songs include two new works by Ethan Sudan, a member of the group, as well as two other contemporary numbers by Toby Tenenbaum and Megan Henderson.

Admission is by donation, suggested $15 – $20.

Patti is a master of simple, pure vocal understatement, a one-in-a-million voice, nationally recognized as an award-winning songwriter, and musically at home in a beautiful array of traditional and contemporary genres. Her songwriting has taken her to stages across the US, from the Telluride Bluegrass Festival to North Carolina’s MerleFest, to Kerrville Folk Festival, to A Prairie Home Companion, where her voice has garnered national attention and she has returned to her native Green Mountain State of Vermont with many awards and accolades. 

Springing from a deep love of traditional Americana music, Patti immersed herself in bluegrass for many years, and was a founding member, songwriter, and lead singer for Vermont’s beloved Bluegrass Gospel Project. She then spent nearly a decade touring nationally with the legendary folk ensemble Woods Tea Company, where her songwriting, singing, flute playing, rhythm guitar work, and seated foot percussion found their way to new areas all across the US.

Patti has produced 5 solo recordings, mostly of her own material and backed up by a roster of musical pals that demonstrates her love of collaboration, and has backed countless other New England musicians’ recordings, done movie soundtrack work, songwriting workshops, and bluegrass jams.

Patti grew up in Vergennes VT, where the sign at the edge of town proudly proclaimed, “Smallest City in the USA,” and now lives in Montpelier VT, the smallest state capitol in the USA. Why haven’t you come to Nashville, they ask, time and again? Because… Vermont. 

With the health of our community in mind, patrons are expected to be vaccinated against COVID -19 and will be asked to show proof of vaccination, either with an original vaccination card, photocopy of the card, cell phone photograph, or verifiable health info PDA app.  

Alternately, attendees can provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test (PCR) performed within 72 hours of the show. In accordance with CDC recommendations and Vermont Department of Health regarding indoor spaces, masks are required.